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Teaching Staff

Dr. LEE Wai Sum, Amy | 李慧心博士

Associate Professor and Associate Head

Office: RRS 629

Tel: 3411 7159

Email: amylee@hkbu.edu.hk

Dr. Lee received her Ph. D in Comparative Literature from the University of Warwick and M.Phil. in Comparative Literature from the University of Hong Kong. Her research interests include Feminist Literary Studies, Gender Studies, the Chinese Diaspora and Representations of Marginal Experiences. Some of her recent publications include “Frozen Motion: Nostalgia and Wang Anyi’s Shanghai.” In Contemporary Asian Modernities: Transnationality, Interculturality, and Hybridity, “Witches in the Young Adult Fiction: Between Cautionary Tale and the Historical Truth” in The Asian Conference on Education, “Searching for the Witch in the Blood: The Autobiographical Trend in Salem Fiction” and “Earnest-ness” in the 21st Century: The graphic diary, the tattoo, and the lie in Oliver Parker’s 2002 film”, both in The International Journal of the Humanities. “Western Humanism and Individuals: Representations of the Chinese Feminine in Contemporary Litreatures in English.” in International Journal of the Humanities (2003), “Narrative Fertility in Migration and Memory: The Feminine Texts of I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem.” and “Land of Many Colors.” in The Transdisciplinary Journal of Emergence, Issue 2, June 2004. Teaching Areas: Gender Studies Human Beings and Their Imaginary Monsters They Create Humanities Study & Research Methods Languages and the Humanities

2014-present, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “Cultural Representations and Meanings of the (Female) Menopause Body in Hong Kong,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant II

 

2013-present, Lee, Amy, Co-Investigator, “Evolution of the 334 Curriculum – Learning from the First Cohort to Improve Teaching Effectiveness and Fine Tune Intended Learning Outcomes,” HKBU Teaching Development Grant

 

2012-2013, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “The Female Subject in Local Self Help Books,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant II

 

2011-2013, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “The Witch Hunt and its Afterlife: Literary Narratives of the Salem Witch Trials,” RGC GRF

 

2010-2012, Lee, Amy, Co-Investigator, “Audience Building for Literature in a Cultural City,” under the main project “Cultivation of Creativity and Artistic Sensibility in a Cultural City,” HKBU Area of Excellence (AoE) project

 

2009-2010, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “Teaching Creativity?! Using Autobiographical Research as a Starting Point to Teach Creative Writing,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant I

 

2008-2010, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “The Salem Witch Trials (1692-1693) as the Threshold to Modernity,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant II

 

2007-2008, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “Literary Magic: Young Readers’ Fiction and the Hong Kong Context,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant II

 

2006-2007, Lee Amy, Principal Investigator, “The Opposite of a Witch?  A Study of Dame Julian of Norwich,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant II

 

2006-2007, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “Using Film in Teaching,” HKBU Teaching Development Grant

 

2005-2007, Lee, Amy, Co-Investigator, “The Representation of Self: A Comparative Study of James Joyce, Virginia Woolf and Wang Anyi,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant I

 

2005-2006, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “The Healing Hands and the Traumatized Body: Fragmentation and Harmony in Colored Sisterhood,” HKBU Faculty ResearchGrant II

 

2004-2005, Lee, Amy, Co-Investigator, “POSIE: Language Arts Learning Materials for Secondary Schools in Hong Kong,” SCOLAR

 

2004-2005, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “Tituba and Her Sisters: Women and Witches in the Postcolonial Narratives of Maryse Conde,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant I

2014, Lee, Amy WS. “Victorie: Maryse Conde’s Silent Mother.” In Sanmartin, Paula (ed.), Reading/Speaking/Writing the Mother Text. (forthcoming)


2014, Lee, Amy WS. “Concept of Fiction in Chinese Mythology and Philosophy.” In Sukla, Ananta (ed.), Art and Fiction: Multidisciplinary and Multicultural Perspectives. London: Bloomsbury Academic London. (forthcoming)


2014, Lee, Amy WS. “‘The Problem that Has No Name’: Love, Desire and Self at Post-middle Age in Love, Again (1996).” In Womanhood in Doris Lessing’s Novels. Seven Towers Publishing. (forthcoming)


2013, Lee, Amy WS. “Is the Cyborg Vampire the Future? Fusing the Historical and the New in the Humanities,” The International Journal of Critical Cultural Studies, 10(4): 93-100.


2013, Lee, Amy WS. “Narrative Freedom and Magic in Its Many Forms: Multiple Entrance to a Historical Experience,” The International Journal of Pedagogy and Curriculum, 19(4): 43-51.


2012, Lee, Amy WS. “Human Beings and Other Creatures: Education for Sustainable Development,” The Asian Conference on Education814-820.


2011, Lee, Amy WS. “Witches in the Young Adult Fiction: Between Cautionary Tale and the Historical Truth,” The Asian Conference on Education, 590-600.


2011, Lee, Amy WS. “Searching for the Witch in the Blood: The Autobiographical Trend in Salem Fiction,” The International Journal of the Humanities,  9(8): 173-182.


2010, Lee, Amy WS. “Earnest-ness” in the 21st Century: The graphic diary, the tattoo, and the lie in Oliver Parker’s 2002 film,” The International Journal of Humanities,8(8): 11-19.


2010, Lee, Amy WS. “Spicing up the classics: Teaching “Earnest-ness” with frivolity in modern film adaptations,” The International Journal of Learning, 17(9): 109-116.


2010, Lee, Amy WS. “Narratives as Tools for Interpretation,” The Inter-Asia Cultural Studies Journal, 11(3): 470-477.


2010, Lee, Amy WS. “Frozen Motion: Nostalgia and Wang Anyi’s Shanghai.” In Chu, Yiu-Wai and Eva Man (eds.), Contemporary Asian Modernities: Transnationality, Interculturality, and Hybridity. Bern: Peter Lang, 213-230.


2009, Lee, Amy WS. “The Charmed Realm in the 21st Century: Onmyoji, the “Nightmare-eater”, and Humanities Education,” The International Journal of Humanities,7(9): 29-38.


2009, Lee, Amy WS. “Onmyoji’s Enchanted Reality,”The International Journal of Learning, 16(9): 461-470.


2009, Lee, Amy WS. “The ‘I’, ‘Tituba’, and the ‘Black Witch’ in Maryse Condé’s Postcolonial-Feminist-Fictional-Auto/Biographical Song,” Germinal: Journal of the Department of Germanic and Romance Studies, 5: 230-242.


2008, Lee, Amy WS. “Henry James Byron.” In Courtney, Angela (ed.),  The Encyclopaedia of 19th Century British Dramatists, Detroit, New York: Thompson Gale, 59-70.


2008, Lee, Amy WS. “Exception.” In Xu, Xi (ed.), Fifty-Fifty, Hong Kong: Haven Books, 83-88.


2008, Lee, Amy WS. “Look Who’s Talking: Migrating Narratives and Identity Construction.” In Davidson, Andrew and Kuah-Pearce Khun Eng (eds.), At Home in the Chinese Diaspora: Memories, Identities and Belongings, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 206-223.


2007, Lee, Amy WS. “Jean McGarry: Trapped Between Dreams and Realities.”  In Ebest, Sally and Kathleen McInnerney (eds.), Too Smart to be Sentimental: The Fiction of Contemporary Irish American Women Writers, Indiana: The Notre Dame University Press, 220-232.


2007, Lee, Amy WS. “Forming a Local Identity: Romance Novels in Hong Kong.” In Goade, Sally (ed.), Empowerment versus Oppression: 21st Century Views of Popular Romance Novels, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Press, 174-197.


2007, Lee, Amy WS. “Feminine Transgression and Crossing Over: Maryse Condé’s I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem.” In Azodo, Ada Uzoamaka and Maureen Ngozi Eke (eds.), Gender and Sexuality in African Literature and Film, Trenton, New Jersey: Africa World Press, 129-137.


2006, Lee, Amy WS. “What You See is What You Are: Feminine Narcissism in The Book of Shadows.”In Ghosh, Ranjan (ed.), (In)fusion Approach: Theory, Contestation, Limits, (in)fusionising a few Indian English Novels (1980-2000),Lanham: Maryland, University Press of America, 279-286.


2005, Lee, Amy WS. “The Everyday Life in the 1970s Hong Kong.” [香港七十年代日常生活: 以故事作為詮釋工具] (in translation) In Cultural Identity, Gender and Everyday Life Practice: Hong Kong Cinema of the 1970s [雜嘜時代:文化身份、性別、日常生活實踐與香港電影1970s] Hong Kong: Oxford University Press, 161-170.


2005, Lee, Amy WS. “Shena Mackay.” In Malcolm, Cheryl Alexander and David Malcolm (eds.), British and Irish Short Fiction, 1945-2000, Detroit, New York: Thompson Gale, 171-177.


2005, Lee, Amy WS. “Anna Louis Strong.” In Rosendale, Steven (ed.), American Radical and Reform Writers, Detroit, New York: Thompson Gale, 327-337.


2005, Lee, Amy WS. “Knowledge of a Hunt: Tituba and Salem Village through the Ages,” The International Journal of Humanities, 3: 263-269.


2005, Lee, Amy WS. “A Language of Her Own: Witchery as a New Language of Female Identity,” Journal for the Academic Study of Magic, 3: 61-77.


2005, Lee, Amy WS. “The Neglected Petry Repertoire: An Alternative Witness inCountry Place,” Interactions, 14(1): 129-139.


2005, Lee, Amy WS. “Emily Holmes Coleman,” The Review of Contemporary Fiction, 25(1):116-138.


2005, Lee, Amy WS. “Love On A Diet(2001): The Film Industry’s Negotiation with Over-Sized Romance,” Feminist Media Studies, 5(1): 96-99.


2004, Lee, Amy WS. “Narratives of Belonging: Feminine Magic and Wonders in Diasporic Writing,” International Journal of the Humanities, 2: 493-500.


2004, Lee, Amy WS. “The Summer Before the Dark: The Void of Motherhood,”Doris Lessing Studies Special Issue “Coming To Age”, 24(1-2): 15-18.


2004  , Lee, Amy WS. “Narrator as Feminist Ally in “The Bones of Louella Brown.” In Ervin, Hazel and Hilary Holladay (eds.), Ann Petry’s Short Fiction: Critical Essays, Westport, Connecticut: Praeger, 119-124.


2003      , Lee, Amy WS. “Western Humanism and Individuals: Representations of The Chinese Feminine inContemporary Literatures in English,” International Journal of the Humanities, 1: 419-434.

2003, Lee, Amy WS. “Dis-seases of Dis-location: Gender and Race in I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem.” Phoebe: Journal of Feminist Scholarship, 15(1-2): 74-82.


2003, Lee, Amy WS. “Masculinity and Fantasy (Travel) Literature.”In Fendler, Susan and Ulrike Horstmann (eds.), Images of Masculinity in Fantasy Fiction, New York: Edwin Mellen Press, 21-42.

2014-present, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “Cultural Representations and Meanings of the (Female) Menopause Body in Hong Kong,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant II

 

2013-present, Lee, Amy, Co-Investigator, “Evolution of the 334 Curriculum – Learning from the First Cohort to Improve Teaching Effectiveness and Fine Tune Intended Learning Outcomes,” HKBU Teaching Development Grant

 

2012-2013, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “The Female Subject in Local Self Help Books,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant II

 

2011-2013, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “The Witch Hunt and its Afterlife: Literary Narratives of the Salem Witch Trials,” RGC GRF

 

2010-2012, Lee, Amy, Co-Investigator, “Audience Building for Literature in a Cultural City,” under the main project “Cultivation of Creativity and Artistic Sensibility in a Cultural City,” HKBU Area of Excellence (AoE) project

 

2009-2010, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “Teaching Creativity?! Using Autobiographical Research as a Starting Point to Teach Creative Writing,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant I

 

2008-2010, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “The Salem Witch Trials (1692-1693) as the Threshold to Modernity,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant II

 

2007-2008, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “Literary Magic: Young Readers’ Fiction and the Hong Kong Context,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant II

 

2006-2007, Lee Amy, Principal Investigator, “The Opposite of a Witch?  A Study of Dame Julian of Norwich,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant II

 

2006-2007, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “Using Film in Teaching,” HKBU Teaching Development Grant

 

2005-2007, Lee, Amy, Co-Investigator, “The Representation of Self: A Comparative Study of James Joyce, Virginia Woolf and Wang Anyi,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant I

 

2005-2006, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “The Healing Hands and the Traumatized Body: Fragmentation and Harmony in Colored Sisterhood,” HKBU Faculty ResearchGrant II

 

2004-2005, Lee, Amy, Co-Investigator, “POSIE: Language Arts Learning Materials for Secondary Schools in Hong Kong,” SCOLAR

 

2004-2005, Lee, Amy, Principal Investigator, “Tituba and Her Sisters: Women and Witches in the Postcolonial Narratives of Maryse Conde,” HKBU Faculty Research Grant I